Member Participation

Australia

Narrative

In joining Mission Innovation, Australia pledged to double government clean energy research and development investment by 2020. Australia supports transparency and early action in setting and declaring baselines.

The baseline we nominated is the 2015 figure reported to the International Energy Agency (IEA) for combined research and development into the following focus areas: renewable energy, energy storage, fuel cells, smart grids, energy efficiency, nuclear and carbon capture and storage. Australia’s total government expenditure in 2015 in these focus areas was approximately AUD $104 million. This excludes research and development spending on fossil fuels other than carbon capture and storage, electricity transmission and distribution networks, recoupable investments made by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC), and expenditure on later stage deployment.

The Australian Government recognises that supporting the development, demonstration and deployment of clean energy technologies will help transition the world’s energy sector to low emissions over the course of the century. As the Prime Minister of Australia, the Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP stated during the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, Australia is optimistic that humanity can meet the climate change challenge.

The Australian Government’s commitment to double early stage research and development is complemented by a range of support across the broader innovation chain. On 23 March 2016, the Australian Government announced the establishment of a new AUD $1 billion Clean Energy Innovation Fund (the Fund) to support emerging technologies make the leap from demonstration to commercial deployment. The Fund will provide both debt and equity for clean energy projects such as renewable energy, energy efficiency and low emissions technologies and be jointly managed by the revitalised CEFC and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA), drawing on their complementary experience and expertise. The Fund will be established from within the CEFC’s AUD $10 billion allocation and make available AUD $100 million a year for ten years. This is part of the Government’s strong commitment to supporting jobs and innovation through investment in clean and renewable energy in Australia. The refocused agencies will work together to provide capital investment and debt finance for Australian businesses and emerging clean energy technologies.

The proportion of Australian households (15 per cent) with rooftop solar photovoltaics (PV) is amongst the highest in the world, and there is high interest in the opportunities for development of new energy storage and battery solutions which will assist to better manage reliable and efficient delivery of electricity. Australia has an ambitious Renewable Energy Target (RET) that will double the installed large-scale renewable energy capacity in Australia by 2020 to ensure around 23 per cent of Australia’s electricity comes from renewable energy by 2020. This is expected to drive over AUD $12 billion in new investment over the next five years. The Australian Government is working with state governments, energy market institutions and industry to support the integration of renewable technologies into the grid.

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) will develop a low emissions technology roadmap in 2016 which will analyse viable alternative technology pathways that could help achieve Australia’s 2030 emissions reduction target, and further emissions reductions in the years beyond. It will consider the potential role that innovative technologies, such as renewable energy, smart grids, carbon capture and storage (CCS), electric vehicles and energy efficiency, could play in Australia’s emission reduction efforts. It will also consider the role of Australian industries in potential supply chains and opportunities to develop local industries where a potential comparative advantage could exist.

Further, the Government has allocated AUD $100 million to support large-scale solar PV projects through the ARENA competitive funding round, which supports the solar PV industry in closing the current gap that exists between large-scale solar PV and other commercially competitive forms of power generation such as onshore wind energy. This builds on the AUD $21.5 million funding provided in 2014 to support 12 cutting edge solar research and development projects, ranging from enhancing existing technologies to advancing emerging technologies in solar PV, solar thermal and solar storage.

The Government has allocated AUD $25 million over the next four years, through the Carbon Capture and Storage Research Development and Demonstration (RD&D) fund, to reduce technical and commercial barriers to the deployment of large-scale CCS projects and thereby encourage industry investment in further deployment of the technology. The fund extends previous research activities to implement CCS for Australian conditions and will provide RD&D support in particular for transport and storage of carbon dioxide.

Through the Australian Research Council, the Government is funding projects that foster stronger industry and university linkages, including a research project that seeks to advance the field of heat transfer in high-temperature systems involving liquid metals, with emphasis on energy storage and solar power technologies. Through ARENA, the Government has allocated over AUD $120 million to fund residential and commercial battery storage projects and solar thermal energy storage projects in Australia, which will help to smooth out renewable energy variability, reduce peak loads, allow utilities to better manage power supply and demand, and potentially mitigate the need for network upgrades.

In December 2015 the Government announced its National Innovation and Science Agenda (the NISA agenda) which outlines how innovation and science will assist in transforming the economy following the mining boom. The Agenda builds on existing actions the Government has taken and focusses on four key pillars: culture and capital; collaboration; talent and skills; and government as an exemplar.

Announced as part of the NISA agenda, Innovation and Science Australia (ISA) will be established as an independent statutory board to provide advice to government on all science, research and innovation matters. ISA will audit the performance of the current Australian innovation, science and research system, including clean energy research, and develop a long-term 15-year strategic plan for innovation, science and research in Australia.

The Government’s new National Energy Productivity Plan sets a target of improving Australia’s energy productivity by 40 per cent between 2015 and 2030, which will drive innovation in energy efficiency technologies and lead the way in transforming our electricity network.

Australian scientists and researchers are making world-leading contributions to the development of clean energy technologies, including in solar PV, solar thermal, wave energy, and biofuels. We are committed to driving innovation and deployment of these technologies on the world stage. Australian innovation has been successfully commercialised in the global marketplace. For example, University of New South Wales photovoltaics innovation will be embedded within almost half of all new solar panels sold globally by 2020.

Our world class universities and research institutions, including the CSIRO, will continue to collaborate with our international colleagues and organisations to unlock new ideas and transitional pathways in the energy sector.

We will continue to build international partnerships to improve commercial opportunities for Australian renewable energy technology, such as the Australia-US Solar Thermal Research Initiative and the Australia-US Institute for Advanced Photovoltaics.

The Paris Agreement signals a global transition to a lower emissions economy and more climate resilient growth. The Australian Government recognises the critical role that clean energy will play in global efforts to reduce emissions, grow national economies and create the jobs of the future. Australia has invested AUD $22 million in the Private Sector Investment Development Group’s InfraCo Asia program which focuses on the development of infrastructure projects, primarily energy. Australia will also invest at least AUD $1 billion in climate finance over the next five years to reduce emissions, build resilience and support climate action consistent with economic development, including in the energy sector.

Australia will review its domestic climate policy settings in 2017 to ensure they are geared towards our 2030 target and the Paris Agreement. The review will ensure that Australia’s policy settings are calibrated to deliver on the commitment to Mission Innovation.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: AUD $104 million (USD $78 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: AUD $208 million (USD $156 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

The baseline we nominated is the 2015 figure reported to the International Energy Agency (IEA) for combined research and development into the following focus areas: renewable energy, energy storage, fuel cells, smart grids, energy efficiency, nuclear and carbon capture and storage. Australia’s total government expenditure in 2015 in these focus areas was approximately AUD $104 million. This excludes research and development spending on fossil fuels other than carbon capture and storage, electricity transmission and distribution networks, recoupable investments made by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC), and expenditure on later stage deployment.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Research and development in low carbon technologies, including end use energy efficiency, renewable energy, nuclear energy, electric grid technologies, carbon capture and storage, and advanced transportation systems and fuels. Investments are implemented through a number of mechanisms including cost-shared projects with the private sector, research and development activities at the National Laboratories, grants to universities, and support for collaborative research centers targeted to key energy technology frontiers.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

The Government’s Innovation and Science Agenda outlines how we will transform our approach to innovation and science right across the economy with major new initiatives.

“The Australian Government recognises the importance of science, innovation and technology to our future prosperity and economic security as a nation in a rapidly expanding and diversifying global economy.” Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, 27 October 2015.

The Australian Government’s support for clean energy extends well beyond the research and development stage, and includes a comprehensive suite of policies to drive innovation and large scale uptake across the energy supply chain.

More detail is available from the Prime Minister’s website here.

Prime Minister Turnbull on Mission Innovation:

“We do not doubt the implications of the science, or the scale of the challenge. But above all we do not doubt the capacity of humanity to meet it - with imagination, innovation and the prudence that befits those, like us, who make decisions that will affect not just our own children and grandchildren but generations yet unborn.

Here in Paris Australia supports a new – and truly global – climate agreement. It is an agreement that must drive humanity’s capacity for inventiveness and a new wave of technological advances. We firmly believe that it is innovation and technology which will enable us both to drive stronger economic growth and a cleaner environment.

We are a highly social and innovative species and so the more we share innovative technologies, the better they will become. Today Australia joins with many other countries in supporting Mission Innovation which aims to double investment in clean energy innovation over the next five years.”

Full statement

Related sites:

Prime Minister’s website

Department of the Environment

Austria

Baseline and Doubling Plans

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Narrative

Additional Information

Brazil

Narrative

Brazil will seek to double its government and/or state directed investment in clean energy technology innovation over the next five years, focusing on renewable and clean energy technologies with the potential to reduce the cost, accelerate public and private partnerships for research, development, demonstration and deployment, and achieve meaningful scale to meet our energy security, economic prosperity, environment sustainability and climate change challenges.

The participation of renewables in the Brazilian energy matrix is around 45%, where the flagships are the sugar-cane ethanol and hydropower. The share of renewable energy sources in our electricity mix varies between 70% and 90%, which includes hydropower, biomass, wind power, and more recently, solar PV. In line with its goal to expand the use of renewable energy sources, Brazil intends that its total energy matrix reaches, by 2030, a share of 28% to 33% from renewable sources (electricity and biofuels) other than hydropower. Brazil also intends to increase the share of renewables – beyond hydropower – in its electricity generation mix to the level of at least 23% by 2030.

In 2015 the Brazilian Government spent approximately R$ 600 million (US$ 150 million) on clean energy technology research, development and demonstration activities. Brazil will seek to double this figure over the next five years. The full suite of low carbon technologies will be considered, including end use energy efficiency, renewable energy, biofuels, nuclear energy, electric grid technologies, carbon capture and storage and advanced transportation systems.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: BRL 600 million (USD $150 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: BRL 1.2 billion (USD $300 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: BRL 720 million (USD $180 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: BRL 120 million (USD $30 million)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 20%

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Survey on clean technologies investments implemented in 2015.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Research, development and demonstration in low carbon technologies, including end use energy efficiency, renewable energy, biofuels, nuclear energy, electric grid technologies, carbon capture and storage, and advanced transportation systems and fuels.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

 

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Related sites:

National portal

Ministry of Mines and Energy

Canada

Narrative

Protecting the environment and growing the economy go hand in hand. Clean technologies are a key component of the Government of Canada’s approach to promoting sustainable economic growth and will play a crucial role in Canada’s transformation into a low-carbon economy. Investing in the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) of clean energy technologies accelerates the innovation required to bring these technologies closer to commercialization. This will help meet climate change objectives, increase the productivity and competitiveness of Canadian firms, and create clean jobs.

At the same time, the imperative to mitigate climate change is urgent and growing, and the Government of Canada is embracing its responsibility to invest in energy research, development and technology demonstration at all stages of the innovation spectrum, from high-risk, early stage research that can deliver transformative energy solutions, to later stage technology demonstrations to help speed the commercialization and adoption of cleaner energy technologies.

That is why in November 2015, Prime Minister Trudeau joined with 19 other world leaders to launch Mission Innovation, through which participants have agreed to double government investment in clean energy innovation over five years, while encouraging private sector leadership in clean energy. Through its participation in Mission Innovation, the Government of Canada aims to:

  • Double federal spending on clean energy innovation by 2019-20.
  • Encourage private sector investment in early-stage clean energy innovation companies in Canada; and
  • Increase domestic and international collaboration to advance Mission Innovation goals.

Since the UN Climate Change Conference (COP21) in Paris, the Government of Canada has moved quickly to take the necessary steps to begin implementation of its Mission Innovation commitment.

On March 22, 2016, the Government of Canada announced its Budget. The Budget highlights Canada’s participation in Mission Innovation, and reiterates the Government’s commitment to support Canada’s transition to a low-carbon economy, and secure a cleaner, more sustainable environment by addressing climate change and air pollution. Through Budget 2016, the Government of Canada has signaled to Canadians, and the world, its intent to accelerate the use of clean, renewable energy while simultaneously finding greener ways of producing and using fossil fuels during the global transition to the low carbon economy of the future.

In support of this vision, Budget 2016 announced a number of early strategic funding proposals, including:

  • $82.5 million, over 2 years, to Natural Resources Canada for the support of research, development and demonstration of clean energy technologies with the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions from Canada’s five largest-emitting economic sectors: oil and gas, electricity generation, transportation, buildings, and heavy industry.
  • $46 million, over 2 years, to Natural Resources Canada for the support of technology demonstration projects that advance electric vehicle charging technology.
  • $50 million, over 2 years, to Natural Resources Canada for investment in technologies that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the oil and gas sector.
  • $50 million, over 4 years, to Sustainable Development Technology Canada for clean technology projects that support the development and demonstration of new technologies that address climate change, air quality, clean water, and clean soil.
  • $30 million, annually, to Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Canada for investigator-led discovery research in the natural sciences and engineering.
  • $50 million, annually, in increased spending by Regional Development Agencies to support clean technology activities.
  • $20 million, over 8 years starting in 2018, to create two additional Canada Excellence Research Chairs in fields related to clean and sustainable technology.

In addition to the initiatives listed above, the Government committed through Budget 2016 to invest over $1 billion over four years to support clean technology in the natural resource sectors, including energy, which will play a critical role in Canada’s transformation into a low-carbon economy; $2.9B over five years for activities that address climate change and air pollution issues, including taking action to reduce emissions from Canada’s largest sources – transportation and energy; and $5B over 5 years for investment in green infrastructure, beginning in 2017.

The Government of Canada is also working to boost domestic and international collaboration that will contribute to advancing Mission Innovation goals. On the domestic front, in March 2016, Prime Minister Trudeau convened a First Ministers’ meeting with his provincial and territorial counterparts to launch the development of the pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. The Framework will serve as the basis for action to meet or exceed Canada’s 2030 emissions targets, and transition Canada to a stronger, more resilient low-carbon economy – while improving Canadians’ quality of life. In recognition of the critical role that energy technology innovation plays in climate change mitigation, the Framework will include recommendations to advance clean technology, innovation and jobs, which will align efforts at all levels of government. In addition, the federal government will work with provincial and territorial governments on work underway through the Canadian Energy Strategy, in order to contribute to the pan-Canadian Framework.

Internationally, the Government of Canada is actively seeking opportunities with international partners to expand its collaboration on clean energy research, development and technology demonstration activities. For example, Prime Minister Trudeau met in March 2016 with United States President Barack Obama in Washington D.C., during which the two leaders issued a Joint Statement on Climate, Energy and Arctic Leadership that included a pledge to leverage participation in Mission Innovation and strengthen collaboration on clean energy research and development for: reducing methane emissions; improving electrical grids; accelerating electric vehicle development and integration; unconventional oil and gas; carbon capture, use and storage; and, new cutting-edge technologies.

Canada is also working trilaterally with its North American partners, the United States and Mexico, through the Memorandum of Understanding Concerning Climate Change and Energy Collaboration that was signed in Winnipeg on February 12, 2016.

Other key Mission Innovation country partners with whom Canada is pursuing collaboration include China and South Korea. As a result, a Joint Declaration on Canada-China Clean Technology Cooperation was signed in Ottawa on February 25, 2016. Natural Resources Canada signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in Innovation and Energy Technologies with the Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy on March 3, 2016 at the GLOBE Summit in Vancouver.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2014-15
  • Baseline Funding Amount: CAD $387 million (USD $295 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2019-20
  • Doubling Target Amount: CAD $775 million (USD $590 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Based on federal energy RD&D expenditures as identified in the International Energy Agency’s Survey of Energy RD&D Expenditures. The baseline is composed of reported federal expenditures for fiscal year 2014-15 of Natural Resources Canada and 14 other federal departments, agencies and organizations. Of these 15 federal contributors to the Mission Innovation baseline, the following six organizations constituted over 90% of Government of Canada spending on energy RD&D:

  • Through collaboration with academia, industry and other governmental partners, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is a performer and a funder of research, development and technology demonstrations to find innovation solutions to environmental challenges in the energy sector.
  • With an organizational focus on basic research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) facilitates partnerships between Canada’s post-secondary institutions and industry, and training Canada’s next generation of scientists and engineers.
  • Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), a federal crown corporation mandated to perform [nuclear-focused] science and technology to meet Government of Canada responsibilities.
  • As a federally-funded, arms-length organization focused on technology development and demonstration, Sustainable Development Technology Canada works to bring economically viable clean technologies closer to market.
  • The National Research Council is a national research and technology organization that works with clients and partners to provide innovation support, strategic research, and scientific and technical services.
  • Through investments in research infrastructure – including state-of-the-art equipment, databases, and laboratories – the Canada Foundation for Innovation allows researchers to push the boundaries of knowledge, explore the unknown and generate exciting outcomes that benefit humankind.

The remaining federal investment in energy RD&D is shared between nine organizations: Transport Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Western Economic Diversification, Agriculture and Agri-foods Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Defence Research and Development Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

The research, development, and demonstration of technologies that provide solutions covering the span of energy supply (e.g., fossil fuels, wind, bioenergy, nuclear), energy transmission (e.g., smart grid, energy storage), and energy use (e.g., buildings, transportation); as well as solutions that improve operational performance or process efficiency, while reducing energy use, waste or environmental pollution.

Federal investments are implemented through a number of mechanisms including: cost-shared projects with the private sector that often leverage provincial and territorial funding programs, research and development activities at National Laboratories and Research Centers, and grants to universities.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Prime Minister Trudeau on Mission Innovation:

“Canada is proud to be a partner in this ambitious global initiative. By working together, we will deliver real benefits for our environment while also strengthening our economy, including through the creation of more middle class jobs.

A strong economy and healthy environment go hand-in-hand, and we are committed to leaving our children and grandchildren with a more sustainable and prosperous country. Mission Innovation will tap into the vast economic opportunities of our environment by helping to create the growth and jobs Canadians need.”

 – Rt. Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

English text

French text

Related sites:

Prime Minister’s website

Canada Doubles Government Investment in Clean Energy Research and Development, June 2, 2016

Prime Minister Announces Action on Clean Jobs and Energy, November 30, 2015

Canada’s Participation in Mission Innovation, November 30, 2015

Ministry of Natural Resources

Chile

Narrative

View The Narrative

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: USD $4.1856 million
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: USD $9 million
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: USD $7.889 million
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: USD $3.703 million
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 88%

Methodology for Determining Baseline

See Additional Information.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

 

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

 

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

 

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Budget Table

FY 20151
MI Baseline

FY 2016
MI Budget

FY 2015 vs. FY 2016
Mission Innovation

(thousand USD)

(thousand USD)

(thousand
USD)

%

Renewable Energy

 

3,551.7

6,119.9

2,568.2

72%

Solar Energy

1,246.2

5,012.6

3,766.5

 

Marine Energy

-

692.2

692.2

 

Biofuels

 

1,890.5

-

1,890.5

 

Clean Energy Access

415.1

415.1

-

 

Energy Efficiency

 

633.8

633.8

179%

Mining Technologies

633.8

633.8

 

Building Technologies

-

1,769.8

633.8

 

Total

 

 

4,185.6

7,889.2

3,703.6

88%

1These figures correspond to an updated calculation of Chile’s governmental investment in clean energy innovation in the year 2015.

Related Sites:

Government of Chile

Ministry of Energy

China

Narrative

In support of economic growth, energy access and security, and an urgent and lasting global response to climate change, China jointly announced the “Mission Innovation”, to accelerate the pace of clean energy innovation to achieve performance breakthroughs and cost reductions to provide affordable and reliable clean energy solutions that will revolutionize energy systems throughout the world over the next two decades and beyond.

I. Baseline and target

The R&D input of China in clean energy totaled 25 billion RMB (roughly 3.8 billion US dollars) in 2015, which was set as the baseline and baseline year of China on “Mission Innovation”.

China’s Doubling Plan target on “Mission Innovation” seeks to double the governmental and/or state-directed investment in clean energy research and development over five years, which means increasing in the input to 50 billion RMB (roughly 7.6 billion dollars) by 2020.

II. Priority Fields input

The Chinese Government is promoting the revolution of energy production and consumption. China is dedicated to clean and efficient utilization of coal resources, and the development of non-coal energy, oil, gas, so as to form an energy supply system driven by balanced development of coal, nuclear and new energy and renewable energy, simultaneously consolidating the power transmission and distribution net, as well as the construction of storage facilities.

Resources’ saving is explicitly emphasized in the strategy of “Comprehensively promoting the development of an ecological civilization”. The Chinese Government is dedicated to economic and concentrated utilization of resources, to promote fundamental change of energy utilization, and strengthen the whole process management to sharply reduce the density of energy consumption, including energy, water, land, and enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of energy utilization, to facilitate the revolution of energy production and consumption, support the development of energy-efficient and low-carbon industries, new energy and renewable energy industries.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: RMB 25 billion (USD $3.8 billion)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: RMB 50 billion (USD $7.6 billion)

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

In the context of the national strategies and the energy mix, China hereby proposes that “clean energy” on “Mission Innovation” covers the clean utilization of coal (including carbon capture and storage) , renewable energy (including solar and solar-thermal), smart grid, bio-energy, hydro power, nuclear fission and fusion, energy storage and deployment of clean energy vehicles (electric vehicles), etc.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

 

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Denmark

Narrative

Denmark has chosen to strengthen our dedicated public investment in clean energy research, development and demonstration focusing on reduction of technology costs and CO2 emissions and with an emphasis on innovative projects that can be replicated and scaled up with the involvement of private investors. We will seek to double these efforts departing from a baseline of the average funding to the Danish Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme (EUDP) of the years 2015-2016 and until 2020.

Energy Technology and Demonstration Programme

The Danish energy research programme, Energy Technology and Demonstration Programme (EUDP), is institutionally part of the Danish Ministry of Energy, Utilities and Climate, and embedded in the Ministry’s energy agency, the Danish Energy Agency. EUDP funds energy related R&D projects based on the following provisions and strategies:

  • The Act on EUDP of 22 December 2010, being the legal provision for the programme
  • EUDP Strategies providing direction on areas and principles of support. The Strategies are reviewed and revised on a four-year basis
  • Calls from the EUDP Secretariat providing detailed guidance for applicants
  • Earmarked funding for politically designated areas.

Act on EUDP
The Act on EUDP is relatively broad in its scope as it aims at supporting the policy objectives of security of supply, considerations for the global climate and for a cleaner environment, as well increased cost-effectiveness. Specifically, it aims at making Denmark independent of fossil fuels. At the same time, the objective is to promote exploitation and development of business potentials and to foster growth and employment.

EUDP is tasked to:

  • Provide funding primarily for development and demonstration projects;
  • Actively promote public-private collaboration, and
  • Strengthen involvement in international activities and programs within energy technology.

EUDP is a quasi-independent institution and is managed by an independent board comprising a chairperson and six members. The board members are appointed by the Minister for Energy, Utilities and Climate for a period of four years.
In terms of scope the vast majority of EUDP grants are allocated to the projects within the following fields of technology: biomass technologies, systems for transport and energy, wind power and other renewable energy technologies, hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, low energy buildings, energy efficient solutions energy system technologies (integration of technologies), energy efficiency measures for oil and gas, and more efficient and environmentally friendly production in general (heat and power), including CCS.

4-year rolling strategies
The EUDP board is responsible for drafting a four year strategy, which outlines key areas and principles for supporting and funding projects over the coming period. The strategy normally takes its point of departure in the strengths and needs of the Danish and the global energy systems. A key feature of the strategy is technology neutrality. Instead, more generic criteria such as cost-effectiveness and unique value-proposition are used as core principles when devising strategies. Another key feature is that the EUDP programme is evaluated after each four-year period in order to gauge its impact and efficiency. Currently, the acting board is drafting a new strategy for the period 2016-2019.

Open calls
The EUDP Secretariat publishes calls for proposals twice a year (spring and autumn), although the frequency depends on the amount of funding to be leveraged. Each call specifies in detail what is required of applicants. The calls are open calls where applicants are encouraged to display their own ideas and project proposals based on new technology and related business plans. Foreign companies, research institutions and universities are allowed to participate in EUDP-projects and to receive funding on an equal footing with Danish participants as long as the lead partner in the project is based in Denmark.

Earmarked funding
In exceptional cases where there is a political aspiration to provide direct stimulus to a specific field of technology in a national context, earmarked funding is provided through the annual Financial Act. Such funds are outlined in dedicated calls. However, these funds are administered in the same way as other EUDP funds and it is the board of EUDP that decides which projects will receive funding.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2015-16
  • Baseline Funding Amount: DKK 292 million (USD $45 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: DKK 580 million (USD $90 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

The Danish efforts to strengthen our dedicated public investment in clean energy research stems from a baseline that is based on the average public funding to the Danish Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme (EUDP) of the fiscal years 2015-2016.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R &D Investment

The Danish definition of Clean Energy for Mission Innovation purposes is based on the approach of the Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme, which primarily supports the following technologies: Biomass technologies, systems for transport and energy, wind power and other renewable energy technologies, hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, low energy buildings, energy efficient solutions, energy system technologies (integration of technologies), energy efficiency measures for oil and gas, and more efficient and environmentally friendly production in general (heat and power), including CCS.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

European Union

Narrative

Recent Statements by EU and EC Officials at the MI Ministerial meeting in San Francisco, June 2, 2016:

“As EU Presidency, we fully support the European Mission Innovation membership,” said The Netherlands Vice-Minister of Economic Affairs Maarten Camps.

“Clean energy is the future, so research and innovation must be at the forefront of our efforts to create sustainable, low-carbon economies,” said European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation Carlos Moedas. “In contributing to Mission Innovation, the European Commission aims to use the European Union’s leadership and political commitment to the development of low-carbon technologies, while sharing its extensive experience in coordinating international research and innovation collaboration, to accelerate the clean energy revolution."

"The European Commission is honoured to be part of Mission Innovation”, said European Commission Vice President for Energy, Maroš Šefčovič. “Scaling up clean energy innovation is key to the success of the European Energy Union and to the implementation of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. It also represents a major global economic and industrial opportunity. Mission Innovation, therefore, coheres perfectly with our upcoming research, innovation and competitiveness strategy.”

Key components of the EC’s Mission Innovation baseline and 5-year growth plan are outlined below.

Industry and Buildings

Buildings and industry account for a substantial share of the total energy consumption and offer high potential for saving energy thus decreasing greenhouse gas emissions. The focus of EU support is on sustainable construction technologies and on measures for an increased uptake of energy- efficient systems and materials in new, renovated and retrofitted buildings. On the industry side, the focus is on enabling technologies (e.g. innovative substances, materials) for the energy-intensive process industry (e.g. chemical, cement, pulp and paper, glass, minerals or non- ferrous metals and steel industries). More information is available here.

Vehicles & other transportation

The decarbonisation of transportation, especially road transport, is crucial for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The EU supports activities targeting transport cleaner technologies (i.e. more energy efficient and based on clean energy sources), as well as more efficient management and manufacturing processes for different transport modes (land transport, water transport, airborne transport). More information is available here.

Biofuels

Europe’s energy and climate goals require the development of new fuels and mobile energy sources, especially for use in transport. The EU supports different bioenergy pathways at different scales while minimising negative environmental and social impacts linked to land use. More information is available here.

Solar, wind & other renewables

Supporting the development of renewable energy technologies has been a major R&D priority for the EU for many years, in particular as regards photovoltaics, concentrated solar thermal, bioenergy, biofuels and renewable alternative fuels, wind, ocean energy, geothermal, hydropower and renewable heating and cooling. More information is available here.

Hydrogen & fuel cells

The EU supports activities on fuel cells and hydrogen (FCH) through the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (a public-private partnership) which covers mobile and stationary FCH applications for use in the energy and transport area. More information is available here.

CO2 capture & storage

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a key option that has to be widely deployed on a commercial scale at global level to meet the challenge of a decarbonised power generation and low-carbon industry by 2050. The EU supports the full CCS chain for a representative portfolio of different capture, transport, storage and re-use technology options. More information is available here.

Electricity grid

Electricity networks are at the heart of creating a pan-European market, integrating a massive increase of renewable energy sources and managing interactions between millions of suppliers and customers. The EU supports new components, technologies, and procedures which respond to the particularities of both the transmission and distribution side of the grid. More information is available here.

Energy storage

Novel energy storage means (including both batteries and large scale storage means such as power-to-gas) and vehicle systems will provide the required flexibility between production and demand. The EU supports energy storage technologies from small to large scale. More information is available here.

Basic research in energy

Novel, more efficient and cost-competitive as well as clean, safe and sustainable energy technologies will be required for the long term. The EU supports multi-disciplinary research to achieve scientific breakthroughs in energy-related concepts and enabling technologies (e.g. nano-science, material science, solid state physics, ICT, bio-science, geosciences, computation and space). More information is available here and here.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2013-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: EUR ‎€989 million (USD $1.1 billion)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: EUR €1.974 billion (USD $2.2 billion)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: EUR €1.297 billion (USD $1.5 billion)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: EUR €308 million (USD $346 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Average of the period 2013-2014-2015 as a reference for the doubling.

EU funding for Clean Energy R&ampD

Taking into account that Mission Innovation was launched during the first part of the EU financial period 2014-2020 (i.e. end of 2015) and that the next financing decision on the overall EU budget will not take place before 2020, the EU takes the average of the period 2013-2015 as a reference for the doubling.

The Baseline Scenario (blue curve in the graph) is a projection of the clean energy R&D budget until year 2020 based on the real budget spent on clean energy R&D for 2014-2015 (real outcome of the calls).

Member-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Sectors of clean energy R&D covered are renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency, energy system (smart grids, energy storage), carbon capture storage and use, and fuel cells and hydrogen. The Technology Readiness Levels covered are between 1 to 8 (i.e. these funds do not include deployment).

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of EU’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Budget and Funding

The budget of the European Union (EU) is decided by the EU Council and the European Parliament. It is multi-annual and since 2007 it is decided for seven years. Experience for more than 20 years shows that there is almost no difference between the R&D budget as planned and as finally executed.

Budget Figures

Budget figures:

  • Figures are based on the budget decision already taken by the EU Council and the Parliament.
  • All figures are in current prices and only relate to operational budgets (i.e. administrative budget are excluded)
  • Figures for the period 2007-2013 include FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) and IEE (Intelligent Energy Europe). They are based on actual budget outturn (difference between the budget stated in the legal base and the budget outturn was below 1%)
  • Figures for Horizon 2020 (2014-2020) are based on latest financing programming (not on actual outturn) and match the budget stated in the legal base.

The EU clean energy R&D budget will be more than doubled over the two financial periods (i.e. between 2007-2013 and 2014-2020 with Mission Innovation scenario) => total EU clean energy R&D budget of EUR 3 813 million and EUR 10 233 million (programmed budget) respectively for each period (i.e. a factor of more than 2.5).

In line with the Paris Agreement in Dec. 2015, the European Commission will step up its efforts towards the transition of Europe to a low carbon economy. This will translate in the Mission Innovation Scenario presented in relation to investment in clean energy R&D, where additional funds will be mobilised from Horizon 2020.

This additional mobilisation of funds in Horizon 2020 will be realised via the Work Programmes 2016-2017, where more priority has been provided to climate related R&D compared to the Work Programmes 2014-2015 (clean energy R&D is a significant part of the climate related R&D). This effort will step up in the Work Programmes 2018-2019-2020, for which flexibility for additional prioritisation exists since the drafting of these Work Programmes has not yet started.

Doubling of the EU clean energy R&D within five years: Between the average annual budget for the period 2013-2015 and the budget programmed for 2020 under the Mission Innovation Scenario, the EU clean energy annual R&D budget will have been doubled (from EUR 989 million on average to EUR 1 974 million).

France

Narrative

To face climate change challenges and be collectively able to limit global warming under 2°C, innovation will be key. It will enable us to act simultaneously towards three major goals: reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, economic development and job creation, and energy security. These goals are at the heart of French energy transition for green growth act, which was passed in 2015 under the initiative of Ségolène Royal, Minister of environment, energy and the sea, president of the UNFCCC COP.

The main issue for emerging technologies and solutions is to go from the prototype stage to the market at a large scale. When new technologies manage to cross the “valley of death”, they are too often restricted to niche markets, usually because of high costs or risks. Although significant progess has been achieved in recent years, for instance in the field of renewable energy, which costs have fallen dramatically, investments are still short what is needed.

Mission innovation is about giving these new technologies and solutions the possibility to play a decisive role in the fight against climate change. The conjunction of public and private efforts at an unprecedented level must enable these revolutionary technologies to overcome barriers, accelerate their development and reach the mass market, to provide every country with reliable and affordable clean energy.

In that context, France committed on November 30th 2015, together with 19 other countries at the launch event of Mission Innovation, to doubling its state-directed public investments in research and development for clean energy over five years, compared to the average investment level during the 2012-2014 period.

These investments will focus on renewable energy, energy storage, carbon capture storage and use, and innovations aiming at improving energy efficiency (including in industry, buildings, transports, circular economy, and smart grids). They will cover the whole chain of innovation, from basic research to demonstration.

Over the 2012-2014, the average state-directed4 public investments in these areas, both through research funding agencies programmes and public research organisations budget allocations, amounted to 440 M€ per year in France, as was reported to the International Energy Agency. This constitutes the baseline for France to be doubled by 2020. Beyond direct funding to R&D and innovation projects, France has also set up complementary instruments, such as a tax credit (“Crédit impôt recherche”), with 5.5 billion euros in 2013 to support companies’ efforts in R&D in all sectors, including in clean energy. France also contributes significantly5 to the European programme Horizon 2020 on clean energy, that amounts to 9.8 billion euros for the 2014-2020 seven-year period.

The doubling effort in France will, for a large part, go through the “Programme d’Investissements d’Avenir” (PIA)6. A first round of this programme was launched in 2010 and a second round in 2014.

French agency of environment and energy management (ADEME) operates in this framework a programme7 with about 3 billion euros funding on the 2010-2020 period (for subsidies, repayable advances, and also private equity in startups and SPVs for first-of-a-kind projects) and has launched a series of calls for projects of demonstrators in the field of clean energy. Around 15 calls were opened at the beginning of year 2016 on various topics covering French perimeter for Mission Innovation and will help accelerating the funding of innovation in the coming months and years.

French agency of research (ANR) operates another PIA programme called “Instituts de la transition énergétique” (ITE) or “energy transition institutes”, with 1 billion euros funding on the 2010-2020 period. ITE gather private industries and public laboratories for the creation of new high standard companies dedicated to R&D and innovation in the field of clean energy: for instance, institute SUPERGRID8 is focused on future electric transmission grids, VEDECOM9 is specialized on sustainable mobility and connected vehicles, INES210 and IPVF11 are dedicated to solar energies, PIVERT12 and IFMAS13 are focused on bio energies, etc.

A third round of the PIA will be launched by the end of 2016, with a total amount of funding of 10 billion euros. President Hollande announced in April that two thirds of this sum will be dedicated to the ecology and energy transition in general, including clean energy innovation in particular.


4 Local authorities funding is not included

5 France provided around 15.8 % of EU budget in 2014

6 http://www.gouvernement.fr/investissements-d-avenir-cgi

7 http://www.ademe.fr/entreprises-monde-agricole/innover-developper/programme-investissements-avenir-pia

8 http://www.supergrid-institute.com/en/home

9 http://vedecom.fr/en/

10 http://www.ines-solaire.org/

11 http://www.ipvf.fr/en/

12 http://www.institut-pivert.com/?lang=en

13 http://www.ifmas.eu/

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2012-2014
  • Baseline Funding Amount: EUR ‎€440 million (USD $494 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: EUR €880 million (USD $989 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Over 2012-2014, the average state-directed2 public investments in these areas, both through research funding agencies programmes and public research organisations budget allocations, amounted to 440 M€ per year in France, as was reported to the International Energy Agency. This constitutes the baseline for France to be doubled by 2020. Beyond direct funding to R&D and innovation projects, France has also set up complementary instruments, such as a tax credit (“Crédit impôt recherche”), with 5.5 billion euros in 2013 to support companies’ efforts in R&D in all sectors, including in clean energy. France also contributes significantly3 to the European programme Horizon 2020 on clean energy, that amounts to 9.8 billion euros for the 2014-2020 seven-year period.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

These investments will focus on renewable energy, energy storage, carbon capture storage and use, and innovations aiming at improving energy efficiency (including in industry, buildings, transports, circular economy, and smart grids). They will cover the whole chain of innovation, from basic research to demonstration.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.


2 Local authorities funding is not included

3 France provided around 15.8 % of EU budget in 2014

Germany

Narrative

President’s Budget Proposal to Advance Mission Innovation

In November 2015 at the COP 21 meeting in Paris chancellor Angela Merkel joined Mission Innovation. Within Mission Innovation 21 countries (incl. EU) share the commitment of doubling their investments in research, development and innovation for clean energy technologies. This is a huge step forward for the promotion of clean energy worldwide.

The Transformation of our energy systems towards reliable and cost effective clean energy is a fundamental part of an effective, long-term global response to our shared climate challenge. Therefore, the Federal Government welcomes and supports this important international initiative Mission Innovation. A step-change, global effort is required to accelerate the pace of technology advance and cost reduction for clean energy. Research and development are an indispensable prerequisite to achieve these goals with our knowledge, creativity and inventive spirit being our most important resources. We need to work together with all interested countries and bundle our competencies to make a difference.

The Federal Government has a pioneering role by early on focussing its energy policy towards an energy system based on high efficiency and renewable energy sources. In September 2010, the Federal Government laid out the plan for the medium to long-term energy supply in Germany with its Energy Concept. After the earthquake disaster in Japan in March 2011 and the resulting flooding of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, the Federal Government re-assessed the role of nuclear power and set the cornerstones for an energy turnaround: nuclear phase-out and a focus on Higher Efficiency and Renewable Energy Sources. This turnaround in energy policy known as the “Energiewende” has attracted attention worldwide. Central goals are the halving of primary energy consumption by 2050 and the expansion of renewable energies to an amount of 60 percent of gross final energy consumption. At present, a third of German electricity comes from wind, solar and others. In addition energy is used more economically. Germany was thus able to cut the output of harmful greenhouse gases by almost 25% between 1990 and 2012. The energy transition has furthermore opened up important new fields of business. New global markets have arisen in the wake of the expansion of renewable energy sources and efficient use of energy.

Nevertheless, the currently available energy technologies might not be sufficient to eventually realize these ambitious goals while preserving security of supply and the level of prosperity.  The Federal Government therefore resolutely focused its funding for research and development on technologies for the energy transition. At the core of this are intelligent solutions in the areas of energy efficiency, energy conservation, renewable energy and supply systems (including storage, grids and ancillary system services through renewable energy).

But the energy transition is not a matter of technological and economic feasibility alone. It is a national task involving every citizen and affecting all levels of policy-making. The energy transition can only be achieved if related technological advances are backed by our citizens. This requires thematically comprehensive and system-oriented research approaches.  Within the framework of project funding questions of implementation and social acceptance need to be taken into account in setting priorities for energy research.

Three Federal Ministries work in close collaboration under one comprehensive energy research program (6. German Energy Research Programme). Thereby, the competencies of the different Ministries complement each other to promote and support research for the “Energiewende” along the whole innovation chain.

In accordance with our commitment to Mission Innovation the Federal Government intends to double its federal budget for research, development, demonstration and innovation for clean energy within five years. By 2020 the Federal Government is aiming to provide more than 900 Mio. € for funding programmes which qualify under the objectives of Mission Innovation.

The Federal Government will further increase its already high efforts for clean energy research and development to support the process of the Federal Energy Concept (“Energiewende”). Funding programmes will be focused on the main pillars of the 6. German Energy Research Programme: energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

At the core of the 6 German Energy Research Programme are the following topics and measures.

Within the renewable energies area the most prioritized measures will be as follow:

  • Photovoltaic: Increase of efficiency, reduction of cost, increase of lifetime and reliability of all components and the whole system, reduction of material use
  • Windenergy: development for onshore and offshore application, reduction of cost, increase of availability and environmental compatibility.
  • Current funding measures (a selection): Storage technologies and Smart Electricity Grids, Energy Storage, Material Research for the Energy Switch

In the field of energy efficiency following activities have highest priorities:

  • Industry, trade and services: R&D of innovative components, new processes and method for decreasing energy demand, anhance demonstration for an accelerated transfer of R&D results
  • Building sector: Exploatation of potentials for efficiency increases and integration of renewable technologies in the heat sector. A new funding initiative “Solar Buildings / Energy efficient Cities” has been started recently.

Recently, the funding initiative Kopernikus Projects for the energy transition has been started. Their name giver, the famous mathematician and astronom Nikolaus Kopernikus, stands for scientific excellence, courage, and a new conception of the world. The Kopernikus Projects are comprehensive initiative for the energy transition so far dealing with the four topics: Future Grid Structures, Power-to-X, Industry Processes, and Energy Systems Integration. In these projects large consortia consisting of scientific institutions and universities, private companies, and organized civil society work together for up to ten years to develop technological solutions for the energy system transformation. High-level representatives from over 90 institutions and organisations contributed their views and opinions to identify the four most important topics for a successful “Energiewende”.

In addition to these measures within the German Energy Research Programme the Federal Government will take up new programmes which will complement the activities for research and technological development. These programmes e.g. for large scale demonstration in different regions of Germany of the future energy system with large amounts of fluctuating renewable energy or technology introduction measures for house hold fuel cell systems are in preparation.

Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy

Federal Ministry of Research and Education

Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2012-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: EUR ‎€450 million (USD $506 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: EUR €900 million (USD $1.0 billion)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: EUR €600 million (USD $674 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: EUR €150 million (USD $169 million)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 33%

Methodology for Determining Baseline

The baseline is calculated by averaging the budget for project funding within the 6th Federal Energy Research Programme on renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies for Fiscal years 2012 to 2015. On average 450 Mio. € were spent in respective research areas within this period.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

The funds available within the individual ministries are primarily aimed at particularly innovative energy technologies that promise to be successful in the long term and are important for Germany’s transition to a sustainable energy supply. Energy policy will therefore focus on renewable energy, energy efficiency, energy storage technologies and grid technology, the integration of renewable energy into the energy supply and the ways in which these technologies interact with one another. Clean Energy under this definition does not include nuclear energy.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Related sites:

Federal Government’s website
Research for Sustainable Development (FONA) - Transformation of the Energy System
Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWI)

Links to Supporting Country Documents:

Joint Research activities:

  • Technological developments must increasingly be assessed from a global perspective. The Federal Government therefore actively promotes research cooperations with other interested countries on the EU-level and internationally.
  • At the European level, the Federal Government particularly supports research cooperations within the EU framework as well as through additional bilateral commitments. With regards to energy research the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy supports applicants in their participation in and successful implementation of the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET Plan). For the implementation of the SET-Plan, Germany has proposed the “Berlin Model.” The core element of this funding model is an as unbureaucratic and efficient multinational funding for research projects as possible in close cooperation with the respective national funding programs or organisations. The first bilateral collaborative projects using this model were successfully started as part of a joint call for proposals with Finland on the topic of energy efficiency in 2013. Other cooperations exist with Austria and Switzerland in research areas which focus on energy efficient cities and hydrogen and fuel cell technology. The Federal Ministry of Research and Education successfully established bilateral research cooperations with many European countries with energy research being one important topic  (https://www.bmbf.de/de/zusammenarbeit-in-wissenschaft-und-forschung-mit-europaeischen-laendern-283.html).
  • At the international level, a very successful instrument for the implementation and coordination of international cooperations are agreements for Science and Technology Cooperation (STC). These agreements are international treaties that provide framework conditions for bilateral research cooperations with non-EU countries. In particular they regulate issues relating to the financing of research staff and student exchanges and the easing of customs and visa requirements for the purpose of such cooperations. The STC treaties thereby facilitate and promote international cooperations. The Federal Ministry of Research and Education has STC treaties with 40 countries including 12 Mission Innovation members (http://www.kooperation-international.de/detail/info/verzeichnis-der-wtz-abkommen.html).

In addition, the Federal Government supports international energy research cooperations within Energy Technology Network of the IEA.

India

Narrative

Government of India is committed to support clean energy research and is pursuing a green path to growth. The Government of India has announced an ambitious plan for deployment of 175 GW renewable energy capacity by 2022 which includes 100 GW of solar 60 GW wind, 10 GW from Biomass and 5 GW from small hydro power. The Government has also embarked on a Major Mission for construction of 100 Smart Cities which includes a blue print with adequate provision for use of renewables and energy efficient technologies.

The National Policy on Biofuels of the Government mandates a blending of biofuels of approx.. 20% by 2017. This is an ambitious target and R&D for new technology and feed stock is being supported to achieve this.

Clean Energy includes

  • Energy Efficiency
    • Industry
    • Residential and commercial buildings, appliances and equipment
    • Transport
  • Renewable Energy Sources
    • Solar energy
    • On-shore Wind energy
    • Off-shore Wind energy
    • Ocean energy
    • Biofuels
    • Geothermal energy
    • Hydroelectricity
    • Other renewable energy sources
  • Hydrogen and Fuel Cells
    • Hydrogen
    • Fuel cells
  • Other power and storage technologies
    • Electric power generation (advance but non-renewable)
    • Electricity transmission and distribution
    • Energy storage (non-transport applications)
    • Smart Grids
  • Other cross-cutting technologies or research
    • Energy system analysis
    • Basic energy research that cannot be allocated to a specific category

While priority Research, Development and Demonstration Deployment in Clean Energy is supported by the Scientific Ministries is supported by different line Ministries of the Government, key Government Departments engaged in Research, Development and Demonstration for Clean Energy are

  • Ministry of Science & Technology (DBT and DST, CSIR)
  • Ministry of Power
  • Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
  • Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change
  • Ministry of Defense Director, DRDO 
  • Department of Atomic Energy
  • Ministry of Earth Sciences
  • Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas
  • Ministry of External Affairs

To meet the ambitious target there is a major focus on accelerating innovation research and demonstration in Clean Energy. Clean Energy Research and demonstration is being supported in Public and Private sectors through research institutions, Universities and Laboratories in priority areas.

For R&D and demonstration projects, grants are provided to academic institutions, research organizations, specialized centers and industry. Strengthening of existing R&D centers and setting up of specialized centers in high technology areas is also considered. Linkages are established between the organizations / agencies undertaking technology development and the user organisations. Transfer of know-how is facilitated to industry. Participation by industry in R&D and technology development is encouraged with increased investment by industry with a view to achieve global competitiveness.
International scientific and technical cooperation in the area of clean energy is established in accordance with national priorities and socio-economic development strategies and goals. Modalities of such cooperation include joint research and technology development, field studies, pilot scale plants and demonstration projects with active involvement of research institutions and industry on either side. Technology induction / transfer is facilitated, where necessary, with time-bound goals for indigenization and local manufacturing. Appropriate bilateral and multi-lateral cooperation programmes for sharing of technologies and funding are developed, and participation in international partnerships, where necessary is also explored.

There is a concerted effort to enhance the pace of innovation and scale of transformation so that we can launch a clean energy revolution to meet the requirements and goals for economic and energy security in a timely manner.

This will be achieved by

  • Strengthening and scaling up research in existing program.
  • Enhanced International Cooperation in priority areas
  • Public Private Partnership with private sector investment
  • Strengthening capacity building for specific skilled requirement.

Plans to double the investments (DB): The specific plans to double the investment in next 4 to 5 years is as follows:

Intensifying research efforts on:

  • Promoting India centric innovation for Clean Energy Proliferation
  • National, bilateral and multilateral joint virtual centres on clean energy themes
  • Technology platform led by industry for select technologies
  • Scaled up funding to academic/ R&D institutions as well as R&D units in the industry for research on identified topics relevant to clean energy.
  • National, bilateral and multilateral capacity building programmes in clean energy.
  • Setting up demand oriented mission programmes on clean energy technologies.
  • Developing models for last mile connectivity for technology leads obtained through R&D.
  • Setting up Demonstration models / pilot plants for developed technologies.
  • Working with all stakeholders to translation of research outputs for end use deployment.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2014-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: INR 470 crore (USD $72 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2019-2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: INR 940 crore (USD $145 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: INR 475 crore (USD $72 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: INR 5 crore (USD $1 million)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 1.37%

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Baseline has been worked out on the data available for each of the priorities sector identified under Mission Innovation for fiscal year 2014-15 (base year) this includes all Government funding by different Department/ Ministries for research, development demonstration activities.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy RD&D Investment

Research, Development and Demonstration in environmentally friendly, clean energy technologies including renewable energy, energy efficiency, Clean fossil technologies, electric grid technologies and advanced transportation systems and fuels and other crosscutting technologies. Investments are made through various models of joint collaboration involving Public Private Sector, National Laboratories, Universities and International Partners.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

 

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Indonesia

Narrative

View The Narrative

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2016
  • Baseline Funding Amount: USD $16.7 million
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: USD $150 million
  • First-Year of Mission Innovation Funding Increment: 2017
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: USD $30.4 million
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: USD $13.7 million

Methodology for Determining Baseline

The baseline year that is 2016, comprising R&D budget for clean energy across various government institutions with total amount of USD16,7 million. At the moment, the majority of R&D budget is allocated to develop cleaner fossil energy, and will remain favorite in 2017 along with growing interest in new and renewable energy, electricity grid and basic energy research.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

At the moment, the majority of R&D budget is allocated to develop cleaner fossil energy, and will remain favorite in 2017 along with growing interest in new and renewable energy, electricity grid and basic energy research.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

 

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Related sites:

National portal

Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

Italy

Narrative

Under approval of the Cabinet of Ministers, and subject to budget law approval

View The Narrative

Baseline and Doubling Plans

Under approval of the Cabinet of Ministers, and subject to budget law approval

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2013
  • Baseline Funding Amount: EUR ‎€222.6 million (USD $250 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2021
  • Doubling Target Amount: EUR €445.3 million (USD $500 million)
  • First-Year of Mission Innovation Funding Increment: FY 2017
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: EUR ‎€267 million (USD $300 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: EUR ‎€44.5 million (USD $50 million)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 20%

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Baseline is composed of the Mission Innovation related parts of enacted appropriations for Fiscal Year 2013 (base year), as identified among selected line items of clean energy RD&D, across the Ministry of Economic Development, and like budget tables of other Governmental Agencies and public R&D Institutions. In the Fiscal Year 2013 Italy has also carried out significant RD&D activities in the fossils and nuclear sectors but it has been decided not to consider these items in the baseline in order to focus the effort on energy efficiency, renewable energy, smart grids and smart cities integrated technologies as stated in the Country definition.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Research and development in low carbon technologies, including end use energy efficiency, renewable energy, electric grid technologies, carbon capture, storage and utilization, and smart cities integrated technologies. Investments are implemented through a number of mechanisms including cost-shared projects with the private sector, research and development activities at the R&D National Agencies, grants to universities and Cohesion Funds at regional level.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

 

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

 

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Prime Minister Renzi on Mission Innovation:

“In this challenge, Italy is well prepared. We are at the forefront of many sectors of the ‘green economy’: we are leaders in geothermal energy, we take 43% of our electric power production out of renewable sources, we rank first at the global level in terms of the share of solar power within our energy mix, which totals 7.9%.

In Government duties, it is a privilege to be called to set the scene in which our daughters and sons will live their lives. To be up to this difficult task, it will be essential to undertake long-term commitments and to change our mindsets.

If we are able to do so, I am sure this hard challenge will be turned into an exciting opportunity for all.”

Related sites:

Government of Italy

Prime Minister’s website

Ministry of Economic Development

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

National Strategy for Competitiveness

Three Year Plan 2015-2017 for National Research of the Electricity System

Japan

Narrative

We have been positively working on R&Ds on energy and environmental fields. The amount of public investments on the R&Ds in our country are the second largest following US, and the first among the major developed countries as a share of GDP

For instance, since the mid-1970s, Japan has been promoting R&Ds of technologies in the field of energy and environment including photovoltaic cells, heat pumps and fuel cells, under the national strategies such as the “Sunshine Project” and the “Moonlight Project”.  Based on such long-term strategies, Japan has realized breakthrough innovations including widely diffusion of solar energy generation and the commercialization of fuel-cell vehicles, ahead of the rest of the world.

In order to accelerate R&Ds of innovative technologies for drastically reducing GHG emissions in the long-term, Japan has established a new national strategy, the “National Energy and Environment Innovation Strategy towards 2050 (NESTI2050)”, in this April.  Under this strategy, Japan will identify such promising technologies as next-generation batteries and technologies related to hydrogen and will focus to conducting R&Ds on these technologies. This effort is in line with that of MI.

We propose the registration of the FY 2016 as its base year and 45 billion yen for its baseline amount. Further, we will try to allocate as much budget as possible to the fields of innovative technologies looking ahead to the year of 2050 in NESTI2050. Even if there are financial constraints, we will aim at doubling the budget in five years.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2016
  • Baseline Funding Amount: JPY 45 billion (USD $410 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2021
  • Doubling Target Amount: JPY 90 billion (USD $820 million)

Country-Definition of Clean Energy RD&D Investment

We have defined “clean energy” targeted in MI as the energy through innovative technologies that are expected to drastically reduce GHG emissions by 2050, which is decided in “National Energy and Environment Innovation Strategy towards 2050 (NESTI2050)” published in this spring.

Specifically, the following eight fields are the decided targets:

  1. Innovative production process
  2. Ultra-lightweight and heat-resistant structural materials
  3. Next-generation batteries
  4. Production, storage and utilization of hydrogen, etc.
  5. Next-generation photovoltaics
  6. Next-generation geothermal power generation
  7. Fixing and utilizing CO2
  8. System infrastructure technologies: energy system integration technologies (AI, Big Data and IoT) and core technologies (next generation power electronics, innovative sensors and superconductivity) constituting the system

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

 

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Mexico

Narrative

View The Narrative

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2012-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: USD $20.71 million
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: USD $62.02 million
  • First-Year of Mission Innovation Funding Increment: 2016
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: USD $70.39 million
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: USD $49.68 million

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Mexico’s baseline with respect to the Mission Innovation commitment is defined by the investments made through the Energy Sustainability Fund (FSE) over the three-year period prior to Mexico’s integration to Mission Innovation, from the 1st of December 2012 to the 30th of November 2015.

Over this baseline period, 63 projects were funded by the FSE, for a total of $62.1 million USD1 (Pre Mission Innovation Investment), which represents $20.71 million USD on average per year for the three-year period.

The graph below (Graph 1) shows the clean energy R&D investment level aimed for the next five years (starting from 1st of December 2015), compared to the $62.1 million USD established as our base line. Mexico plans an investment for clean energy R&D of $310.1 million USD by 2020. Therefore, the clean energy R&D investment will be doubled by 2017.

Graph 1: Accumulated Investment

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

The establishment of Mexican Energy Innovation Centres (CEMIES) represent the largest projects that are currently being developed on clean energy R&D in Mexico.

The CEMIES are expected to provide a platform to launch and grow an unprecedented portfolio of low carbon activities, through a guaranteed 4 years funding scheme to deliver low carbon innovation.

  • CEMIE Geothermal ($23.6 million)
  • CEMIE Wind ($6.6 million)
  • CEMIE Solar ($9.9 million)
  • CEMIE Ocean ($19.8 million)
  • CEMIE Bioenergy ($40.1 million)
  • CEMIE CCSUS ($28.6 million)
  • CEMIE Smart Grids ($25.7 million)

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

 

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Related sites:

President’s website

Ministry of Energy

Norway

Narrative

View The Narrative

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2013-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: NOK 1.132 billion (USD $140 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: NOK 2.265 billion (USD $280 million)
  • First-Year of Mission Innovation Funding Increment: 2016
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: NOK 1.419 billion (USD $176 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: NOK 287 million (USD $36 million)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 25%

Methodology for Determining Baseline

The baseline is composed of relevant budgetary allocations for the fiscal years of 2013-2015, as defined by the Norwegian definition of clean energy RD&D, of the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy.

Other Ministries may also have relevant budgetary allocations. These are not included in the MI baseline, nor will they be counted in as part of the target funding amount in 2020. The state budget is decided by the Norwegian parliament annually.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Research, development and demonstration in environmentally friendly technologies, including end-use energy efficiency, renewable energy, electric grid technologies, CO2 capture and storage and low-carbon transportation systems and fuels.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Republic of Korea

Narrative

The Republic of Korea will endeavor to double its governmental and/or state-directed clean energy research and development investment over five years from USD $490 million in fiscal year 2016 to USD $980 million in fiscal year 2021.

The increased investment will be concentrated in clean energy technologies:  renewables, energy efficiency improvement, clean thermal power, smart grids, carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), energy storage systems (ESS), nuclear power, etc.

As announced at COP21 in Paris, the Korean government, seeing the climate change response as an opportunity for growth, is exerting its efforts in new energy industries to develop and demonstrate new energy business models* using clean energy technologies. It aims to support the growth of new energy industries by attracting more private investment through preemptive public investment in developing clean energy technologies.

New energy industries are expected to create a market worth approximately USD $100 billion by 2030, providing various business opportunities to companies around the world. The Republic of Korea hopes to see Mission Innovation lay the foundation for effective coordination of public-private investment, thereby contributing to global climate change response and economic growth.

* DSM (Demand Side Management) trading market, EV battery leasing and charging service project, solar PV rental project, etc.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2016
  • Baseline Funding Amount: USD $490 million
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2021
  • Doubling Target Amount: USD $980 million

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

The increased investment will be concentrated in clean energy technologies:  renewables, energy efficiency improvement, clean thermal power, smart grids, carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), energy storage systems (ESS), nuclear power, etc.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

 

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Prepared Remarks for Launch Event:

H.E. President Park Geun-hye

Related sites:

President’s website

Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy

Republic of Korea’s International Joint Energy R&D Program

Republic of Korea’s International Joint Energy R&D Program was first launched in 2011 to provide financial aid for research projects jointly conducted by domestic and international research institutions with funding from the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy. The main goals of the Program are to promote the exchange of human resources and information between domestic and international research institutions, to carry out multifaceted cooperation on the governmental and private levels, and to achieve energy innovation through international joint R&D activities.

The Program strives to promote energy technology development, to further boost the global energy market, and to secure greater competitiveness through the convergence of different technologies from around the globe. Furthermore, it aims to improve clean energy technology competence and to contribute to the creation of new energy markets by promoting international cooperation, readily identifying and obtaining cutting-edge technologies and providing a platform to advance into the global market through an open innovation paradigm.

The Program provides multi-directional support. Bottom-up support is designed to effectively respond to demand in the field, such as the needs of SMEs for demonstrations and product commercialization and the needs of research institutions for energy innovation through joint research projects. Top-down support capitalizes on government-level cooperation in the form of MOUs between governments, etc. For the latter direction, energy technology issues are introduced and discussed by the countries concerned through events such as joint workshops to plan and design projects before they are publicly announced. Such projects are funded jointly by the government of the Republic of Korea and the government of the partner country. Since its inception in 2011, the Program has funded various projects jointly conducted with the US, UK, Canada, and Germany. The list of our partner countries is also expanding continually, with the Czech Republic and Mexico recently added.

Saudi Arabia

Narrative

Saudi Arabia believes that technology provides the answer to climate change challenges. Technology has done so for mankind throughout history and it requires greater innovation, collaboration and investments to address climate change.

Saudi Arabia is pursuing technology innovation on greenhouse gas management, energy efficiency and renewable energy. The Kingdom established a technology roadmap that encompass the following five areas: (i) capture fixed sources, (ii) carbon dioxide reduction from mobile sources such as cars, marine, trains, (iii) industrial applications for polymers, carbon fiber, construction materials, and chemicals, (iv) carbon dioxide storage in saline water aquifers, (v) and carbon capture, utilization, and storage. In addition, the Kingdom is investing in developing and implementing a renewable energy program as well as energy efficiency technologies in areas such as air-conditioning and thermal insulation.

The Kingdom is currently active at the national level through specialized science and technology cities, universities, centers, nationally owned companies as well as the private sector in promoting R&D in these focus areas. Collaboration in these focus areas are encouraged with international research centers to advance innovation in the clean energy technology domain.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: SR 281.3 million (USD $75 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2021
  • Doubling Target Amount: SR 562.5 million (USD $150 million)
  • First-Year of Mission Innovation Funding Increment: 2017
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: SR 337.5 million (USD $90 million)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: SR 56.3 million (USD $15 million)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 20%

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Carbon management from mobile and stationary sources, CO2 utilization, CCUS, transport fuels, energy efficiency, energy storage, renewables (solar and wind).

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

 

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

 

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Sweden

Narrative

Background

Sweden has had a government funded Energy RD&D programme since 1975.

The programme is currently focused on six different thematic areas within clean energy and in general finances activities on renewable energy and energy efficiency.

The six thematic areas are 1) Biobased Energy Systems, 2) Energy in the Built environment, 3) The Electricity System, 4) Energy in Transport, 5) Energy Intensive Industry, and 6) Energy System Studies. The thematic area 3) also includes non-fuel based electricity production, i.e. wind, solar, marine, etc. Fission, fusion or fossil fuel technologies are currently not included at all. Energy in transport focuses on renewable transport fuels as well as the electrification of road traffic etc.

The programme uses a portfolio of tools from energy relevant basic research to large scale demonstration, seed capital and product development.

There is also a mix between programmes, centres and projects with specific technology aims and goals as well as programmes and projects that are bottom-up and freely formulated by researchers and industry.

Doubling

For the Mission Innovation, Sweden has chosen to double the parts of our energy R&I that focus on long-term, transformative research and development, and that fund projects formulated bottom-up by researchers/industry.

We will seek to double these efforts departing from a consolidated base of the average funding of the years 2013-2015 and until 2020. An average number is chosen because of variations in the funding over time.

The baseline number of 134 million SEK relates to the activities of Basic Energy Research, Innovative and energy relevant research and development, and energy relevant Strategic Innovation Areas. These three programmes are characterized by not having a specific technology focus beyond being original and excellent and addressing the energy challenge within the overall focus of renewables, efficiency, electricity and energy transmission and distribution, and energy systems.

The above mentioned activities are to be doubled by 2020.

Narrative

Efforts are made to have a balanced portfolio of themes, activities and funding instruments in the Swedish Energy R&I programme.

One aspect of this is the need for activities that are open for new ideas and new ways of tackling the energy challenge. So, while many of the programmes, centres and projects are initiated as an answer to detailed and technically specified calls of proposals, there are some programmes that are open for new and unexpected ideas. A need for boosting these kinds of activities has been highlighted. Also, the need for transformative R&D has been mentioned in the writings leading up to the establishment of the Breakthrough Energy Coalition. Sweden’s doubling pledge is just about this kind of action.

General

In addition we are already on track to increasing the total programme on Energy R&I.

A baseline funding for the entire programme was established by a decision in 2007. This baseline was around 900 million SEK in the period 2007–2012. A baseline calculated as an average for the period 2013–2015 would be 1 139 million SEK. This value is calculated on the actual payment to all the projects in the programme, not the budget allocation.

An increase is to be expected from this baseline and forward. Decisions on general funding are taken in four year periods, and more in detail for each fiscal year. Proposals for coming years are currently being developed.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2013-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: SEK 134 million (USD $17 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: SEK 270 million (USD $33 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

A baseline funding for the entire programme was established by a decision in 2007. This baseline was around 900 million SEK in the period 2007–2012. A baseline calculated as an average for the period 2013–2015 would be 1 139 million SEK. This value is calculated on the actual payment to all the projects in the programme, not the budget allocation.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

The six thematic areas are 1) Biobased Energy Systems, 2) Energy in the Built environment, 3) The Electricity System, 4) Energy in Transport, 5) Energy Intensive Industry, and 6) Energy System Studies. The thematic area 3) also includes non-fuel based electricity production, i.e. wind, solar, marine, etc. Fission, fusion or fossil fuel technologies are currently not included at all. Energy in transport focuses on renewable transport fuels as well as the electrification of road traffic etc.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

 

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

 

Electricity grid

Energy storage

 

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

United Arab Emirates

Narrative

The UAE leadership has launched the UAE Vision 2021 strategy which aims to make the UAE among the best countries in the world by the Golden Jubilee of the Union. In order to translate the Vision into reality, its pillars have been mapped into six national priorities which represent the key focus sectors of government action in the coming years and this includes Competitive Knowledge Economy and Sustainable Environment and Infrastructure. Reflecting the UAE Vision 2021, clean energy is core to the UAE’s INDC, which sets a national target to increase clean energy to 24% of the total electricity generation mix by 2021, from under less than 1% today. Advancing innovation and technological breakthroughs is critical to addressing climate change and also aligns with the UAE’s long-term commitment to diversify our economy and energy mix. On November 30th 2015 the UAE joined the world leaders in Paris to launch Mission Innovation which aims to accelerate the public and private global clean energy innovation with the objective to make clean energy widely affordable.

In 2014, the UAE launched a National Innovation Strategy and the Science and Technology with the aim of making the UAE one of the most innovative nations in the world within seven years. The strategy aims at: insuring an innovation friendly ecosystem (including enhanced regulatory framework, technology infrastructure, supporting services, investments and incentives); creating a culture of innovation among individuals, firms, and the public sector; focusing on seven main sectors to lead innovation on the national level. Renewable and Clean Energy is one among the seven main sectors identified by the government.

Following the launch of the National Innovation Strategy the Science Technology and Innovation policy was prepared and which identified 24 focus areas including Solar and Alternative Energy Technology Systems and Smart City Applications and Solutions. Under the guidance of the national strategies the UAE is moving towards innovation in clean energy and energy efficiency to address economic growth and energy security.

In line with the vision of the mission innovation the UAE pledges the doubling clean energy R&D by 2021 based on the baseline set in 2015. These support highlight UAE’s strong believe in research and development for resolving the challenge which hinder the implementation of clean energy and energy efficiency programs in UAE.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: USD $10 million
  • Doubling Target-Year: 2021
  • Doubling Target Amount: USD $34.1 million
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: USD $12.2 million
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: USD $2.2 million
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 18.8%

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Low C/GHG technologies, including End-Use Efficiency, Renewables Energy, Nuclear, CCUS, Electric Grid, Storage technologies, Sustainable Transport system and fuel, Use-Inspired Basic and Exploratory Research.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

 

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Additional Information

Budget


*The above figure reflects the commitment of the UAE for innovation of new clean energy technologies that will address the challenge which could prevent the wide application of clean energy technologies in the UAE.

Quotes

“Recently, the UAE has witnessed record reduction in levelized cost of power generation from utility grade solar pv plants. The latest auction for a 800 MW plant in Dubai achieved a new record price of 2.99 US Cents/Kwh. The UAE’s investment in solar is part of a broader national strategy to diversify the power supply mix and reduce reliance on natural gas which has been fueling water and power generation in the country almost entirely. UAE’s national target of 24% clean power in overall generation mix by 2021 shall be exceeded by current projects only. In addition to the 800 MW, another 350 MW solar power project tender was floated in Abu Dhabi, which received bids from over 30 companies highlighting a rapidly evolving solar market in the country. These solar projects are being developed through an IPP framework which has brought in significant investment to the country in solar power generation. To facilitate the deployment of solar in UAE, the government has also invested in innovative applied research projects. In particular, the research and development seeks to tailor the solar technologies to the harsh climate of the region. The knowledge developed shall be useful for increased adoption of solar in all desert countries.

 – H.E. Dr. Matar Hamed Al Nyadi, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Energy of the United Arab Emirates

Related sites:

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum’s website

Masdar

Masdar Institute

United Kingdom

Narrative

Access to secure, affordable, clean energy is critical to the world’s ability to keeping global warming below 2 degrees. We have seen the cost of some clean energy technologies fall significantly in recent years but more innovation across a range of technologies is needed if we are to meet the challenges of population growth, increased consumption and increased urbanisation in a sustainable manner.

The UK has a long history and strong capabilities in research, development and demonstration (RD&D). We want to ensure we harness and support the creativeness, ingenuity and entrepreneurship of our universities and businesses in tackling the challenge of making clean affordable energy widely available. Doing so will require both public and private sector investors to invest more in energy RD&D and to work in far closer partnership to ensure that the best ideas are developed, tested and pulled through to market as quickly as possible. Investing in low carbon energy now will drive down the costs and ensure countries can take more ambitious action to cut their emissions before 2030 and grow their economies sustainably in the long term. For those reasons the UK government is delighted to have joined with other countries and private sector investors as part of Mission Innovation.

As part of our commitment to the goals of Mission Innovation the UK will, over the next 5 years, seek to double our central government spending on clean energy technology research, development and demonstration projects that support Mission Innovation’s objectives. On average over the last 3 years UK central government has invested circa £200m per annum in relevant clean energy research, development and demonstration. In 2020/21 we therefore expect to invest in excess of £400m (c.US$600m). This investment will also be complemented and enhanced by other regional investments as well as by funding for research in related areas that could also support our clean energy objectives.

Our programmes will include support for the full range of RD&D projects from early stage, disruptive ideas through to partnerships with private sector investors to test and prove new technologies in real world applications as an enabler of widespread deployment. We wish to focus our resources on those areas where we can have the optimal impact to deliver our programme objectives and we are currently developing the details of our plans for the 5 years to 2020/21, informed in part by the insights Mission Innovation is providing us. Our clean energy innovation programme includes more than £250m over 5 years of investment in Nuclear Research and Development, including Small Modular Reactors, and in excess of £50m over 5 years for Smart Energy Systems. Further details of our priorities and plans will be announced later in 2016 and we will share that detail with fellow Mission Innovation countries.

We expect that our programmes will accelerate technology development that will have benefits for developed and developing countries alike, but as part of that up to £100m (£40m from DECC SR ODA allocation, the rest from other departments) of our total spend in 2020 will be specifically focused on projects that will help address the energy needs of developing countries.

Investing more is a critical step but we also need to ensure we maximise the positive impacts of our increased investment. The UK has been championing the need for greater transparency on clean energy objectives and plans and for more collaboration between public funders and between public & private investors. By working together we can maximise our collective impact. The UK will therefore continue to prioritise working with Mission Innovation partners to ensure this important component of Mission Innovation is delivered.

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): 2013-2015
  • Baseline Funding Amount: GBP £200 million (USD $290 million)
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2020
  • Doubling Target Amount: GBP £400 million (USD $580 million)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

The baseline is based on the average annual investment over the 3-year period from 2013 to 2015. This figure does not include investments made by Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

The emphasis will be on TRLs 3-8, that is, for applied energy R&D through to demonstration, focused on renewable energy, smart grid, nuclear, CCS, and other technologies.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

 

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

 

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

 

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

United States

Baseline and Doubling Plans

  • Country-Determined Baseline Year(s): FY 2016
  • Baseline Funding Amount: USD $6.415 billion
  • Doubling Target-Year: FY 2021
  • Doubling Target Amount: USD $12.830 billion
  • First-Year of Mission Innovation Funding Increment: FY 2017 (proposed)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Amount: USD $7.7 billion (proposed)
  • First-Year Mission Innovation Funding Increment: USD $1.3 billion (proposed)
  • First-Year Funding Percent Increase: 20% (proposed)

Methodology for Determining Baseline

Baseline is composed of the Mission Innovation related parts of enacted appropriations for Fiscal Year 2016 (base year), as identified among selected line-items of clean energy RD&D itemized in separate table, across the U.S. Department of Energy, and like‐budget tables of 11 other Federal agencies.

Country-Definition of Clean Energy R&D Investment

Research, development, and demonstration of energy-related hardware, software, systems, or practices that avoid, reduce, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions or other air pollutants. This includes technologies that convert, convey, or store energy resources, improve energy efficiency, or reduce energy consumption. Investments are implemented through a number of mechanisms including cost–shared projects with the private sector, research and development activities at the National Laboratories, grants to universities, and support for collaborative research centers targeted to key energy technology frontiers.

Overview of Clean Energy R&D Focus Areas Emphasized in Mission Innovation Portfolio

Industry & buildings

Vehicles & other transportation

Bio-based fuels & energy

Solar, wind & other renewables

Nuclear energy

Hydrogen & fuel cells

Cleaner fossil energy

CO2 capture, utilization & storage

Electricity grid

Energy storage

Basic energy research

Indicators are for key areas of Mission Innovation R&D investment but do not imply a comprehensive representation of a country’s full R&D portfolio.

Narrative

In November, President Obama and other world leaders came together in Paris to launch Mission Innovation, a landmark commitment to dramatically accelerate public and private global clean energy innovation. Through the initiative, 20 countries representing at least 80 percent of global clean energy research and development (R&D) budgets committed to double their governments’ R&D investments in this domain over five years. These additional resources will dramatically accelerate the availability of the advanced technologies that will define a future global energy mix that is clean, affordable, and reliable.

The same gathering marked the launch of the Breakthrough Energy Coalition, an independent initiative spearheaded by Bill Gates.  The Breakthrough Energy Coalition is a group of 28 influential investors from 10 countries committed to providing “patient”, early-stage capital that will take innovative technologies from the world’s great laboratories and help build them into energy solutions at scale.  In the past, too often promising energy technologies have not crossed the investment “valley of death,” where there was insufficient private-sector funding to develop ideas that require a long time horizon to achieve commercial readiness.

While the Breakthrough Energy Coalition is an independent effort and not formally affiliated with Mission Innovation, it is committing to help bridge that valley of death for those technologies developed in the countries that sign up for Mission Innovation and that have the best chance of providing reliable, affordable energy for everyone.

Accelerating clean energy innovation is essential to achieving the goal of limiting the rise in global temperatures to well below 2˚C. While significant progress has been made in cost reduction and deployment of many clean energy technologies, the pace of innovation and the scale of transformation risk falling short of what is required. Mission Innovation and the Breakthrough Energy Coalition constitute powerful complementary efforts to expand research and development for cutting-edge clean energy technologies and support a new generation of scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs.

Mobilizing private-sector investment continues to be a key component the Administration’s clean energy innovation strategy, such as through the Administration’s Clean Energy Investment Initiative, which has catalyzed more than $4 billion of independent commitments by major foundations, institutional investors, and other long-term investors, along with executive actions to scale up investment in clean energy innovation.

To reinvigorate global efforts in clean energy innovation, all participants in such efforts share a common goal to develop and scale breakthrough technologies and substantial cost reductions to enable the global community to meet our shared climate goals, increase access to clean and affordable energy, support economic development, and strengthen energy security.

Today, President Obama announced the next step in advancing the U.S. commitment to Mission Innovation, laying out his proposal to double federal investment in clean energy research and development from $6.4 billion in FY 2016 to $12.8 billion in FY 2021.

This investment portfolio spans the full range of research and development activities – from use-inspired basic research to demonstration. Doubling this investment will require about a 15 percent increase in clean energy R&D funding in each of the five years of the pledge. The FY 2017 Budget makes the Administration’s commitment clear by providing $7.7 billion in discretionary funding for clean energy R&D across 12 agencies, which is approximately 20 percent above the FY 2016 level.

Mission Innovation investments include:

Department of Energy (DOE). About 80 percent of the government-wide Mission Innovation investment supports DOE research, development, and demonstration activities across the spectrum of clean energy technologies. FY 2017 DOE highlights include:

  • Over $105 million for new innovation initiatives to accelerate the rate of invention and successful commercialization of sustainable transportation, renewable power, and energy efficiency technologies, including expanded innovation partnerships with the National Laboratories;
  • Over $110 million for new Regional Clean Energy Innovation Partnerships that will support clean energy R&D solutions targeted to the unique characteristics of each region, and draw upon the strengths of each region’s innovation ecosystem;
  • Over $261 million for advanced clean energy manufacturing R&D projects and facilities, including two new National Network for Manufacturing Innovation Institutes;
  • Over $880 million in cutting-edge sustainable transportation technologies to increase the affordability and convenience of advanced vehicles and domestic renewable fuels;
  • Over $500 million to increase the use and reduce the costs of clean renewable power from solar, wind, water, and geothermal energy, including $213 million to support the SunShot Initiative mission to make solar energy fully cost-competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of this decade;
  • Over $1.8 billion in basic clean energy research on energy production, conversion, storage, and use, as well on as advancing our understanding of the earth and its climate;
  • Over $804 million for programs and infrastructure that support the advancement of nuclear energy technologies, including R&D in advanced nuclear reactor technologies, life extension for existing power plants, and advanced nuclear fuels;
  • Over $177 million to support grid modernization, resiliency, and integration of clean energy into the grid; and
  • Nearly $564 million in research focused predominantly on development and deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies as well as other approaches to improve the emissions performance of energy generated from fossil fuels.

Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). The Budget includes $350 million in Mission Innovation discretionary funding for DOE’s ARPA-E, which supports transformational applied clean energy R&D across a wide array of technologies.

Beyond these discretionary funds the Budget also includes $150 million in mandatory funding for ARPA-E in 2017 as part of the ARPA-E Trust proposal, which seeks $1.85 billion over five years in mandatory funding for the program. Under that proposal, the FY 2021 budget for ARPA-E would grow to approximately $1 billion.

National Science Foundation (NSF). The Budget includes $512 million for NSF research in a wide array of energy technology areas such as the conversion, storage, and distribution of diverse power sources, and the science and engineering of energy materials.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Budget includes $348 million for clean energy research at NASA in areas such as revolutionary aircraft technologies and configurations to enable fuel-efficient, low-carbon air transportation.

Department of Agriculture (USDA). The Budget includes $106 million at USDA for competitive and intramural research funding to support development of bio-based energy sources that range from sustainable and economical forest systems and farm products to increased production of biofuels. These investments build on an ongoing commitment to advance renewable energy deployment and increase access to clean energy for all Americans.

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Budget expands HUD’s clean energy R&D efforts to help facilitate builders, property owners and tenants to take actions that result in improved energy efficiency or expanded use of low- and no-carbon energy sources. This $10 million effort includes the creation of an advisory group of researchers, builders, tenants, and homeowners to design and implement studies on how to facilitate long-term behavior change in the housing sector, and the evaluation of a clean energy pilot intended to incentivize multifamily property owners and tenants to reduce energy consumption.

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). USAID will establish a new R&D effort through the Global Development Lab and the Global Climate Change Initiative that will support joint efforts in clean energy – such as electric vehicles or affordable energy-self-sufficient, or net-zero-energy, housing and community buildings – that are important to developing nations.

Additional Information

Budget

Mission Innovation in the FY 2017 President’s Budget

The FY 2017 President’s Budget reflects the strength of the U.S. Government (USG) commitment to Mission Innovation (MI). The Budget includes information on the USG MI clean energy pledge baseline, target, and potential trajectory. It also provides background on MI as well as highlights of clean energy R&D activities across the USG.

The Administration included discussion of MI in several volumes of the FY 2017 President’s Budget to ensure the message reaches a variety of stakeholders. These references are summarized below.

Background, Pledge summaries, and FY 2017 details

Main Budget Volume

This document includes summaries of the MI initiative and the USG commitment to seek a doubling of clean energy R&D funding over five years, including the government-wide FY 2016 baseline, FY 2021 target, and funding level in the FY 2017. The text can be found on pages 17-18 of the Main Budget Volume.

Advancing Clean Energy fact sheet

This document provides summaries of the MI initiative and the FY 2017 clean energy R&D funding at various USG agencies, as well as a discussion of complementary (non-MI) efforts. The fact sheet is a stand-alone document, which can be found here.

Research and Development Chapter, Analytical Perspectives Volume

This document includes an MI initiative summary and information on the FY 2017 Budget funding for clean energy research, development/demonstration, and deployment, of which Mission Innovation funding is a subset. (Clean energy research and development/demonstration funding is part of the MI doubling pledge but clean energy deployment funding is not.) The text can be found on the first page of the Analytical Perspectives Volume Research and Development chapter, page 299 of the overall document.

Initial Pledge Trajectory

The Administration embedded in the FY 2017 Budget an initial five-year clean energy pledge funding trajectory in the “outyear” estimates (funding estimates for years beyond FY 2017). While budgetary decisions are generally made year-by-year for activities like R&D, the Administration specifies outyear levels for some individual efforts, like Mission Innovation, to demonstrate our commitment and acknowledge the costs associated with it. This action shows that clean energy R&D funding is a high priority within the planned funding over the next five years.

The initial trajectory presented in the FY 2017 Budget is preliminary and should not be interpreted as pre-approved future funding levels for any particular USG agency/department or program. Funding levels will be revisited each year through the annual Budget formulation and appropriation processes and modifications will be made as needed.

As a result of budget structure requirements and other factors, there is no single place in the Budget where the individual MI outyear targets for FY 2018-FY 2021 are shown in full. A portion of the funding for these outyears is incorporated in individual accounts in agencies across the government that conduct clean energy R&D and the remaining funding needed to reach the FY 2018-FY 2021 pledge trajectory targets is captured in two placeholder accounts.

Taking the individual account assumptions and the placeholder accounts together, the initial pledge funding trajectory assumed in the FY 2017 Budget is as shown in the following table:

FY16 Enacted FY17 Budget FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21
Gov’t wide total clean energy RD&D funding 6.4 7.7 8.8 9.9 11.3 12.8

For reference, a portion of this outyear funding is discussed on page 427 of the Budget AppendixVolume, and the placeholder accounts can be seen in the Supplemental Materials Table 28-1.

U.S. Clean Energy Appropriations

Remarks at Launch Event:

President Barack Obama (text) (video)

Related sites:

White House

White House Fact Sheet: U.S. Hosts World’s Energy Ministers to Scale Up Clean Energy and Drive Implementation of the Paris Agreement, June 2, 2016

White House Blog, “Accelerating Clean Energy Technology Solutions through the President’s Budget”, February 12, 2016

White House Fact Sheet: Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Overview, February 9, 2016

White House Fact Sheet: Budget Proposal to Advance Mission Innovation, February 6, 2016

White House Blog, “Announcing: Mission Innovation”, November 29, 2015

White House Fact Sheet: Mission Innovation, November 29, 2015

Department of Energy

Boston Globe, Secretary of Energy Moniz, “Need for Investment in Clean Energy Innovation”, November 30, 2015

Revolution...Now, Report from the Department of Energy, November 2015

Quadrennial Technology Review, Report from the Department of Energy, September 2015

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